About your Search

20090801
20090831
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
on cnn express. joining us from the missouri state fair. talk about getting the pulse of america, what are you hearing? >> reporter: we have been driving from atlanta to des moines and passed through georgia, tennessee, kentucky, illinois, missouri, heading into kansas and iowa. we're talking to people in places smaller than what would get media coverage about health care. as the health care debate was heating up on tv, we were trying to get a quieter discussion going. there was plenty of disagreement where we went. we ended up in an interesting place, northwestern kentucky on the illinois border. we had a bit of a town hall meeting. one was a democratic candidate who ran in the last election and lost. she had very, very strong views on health care. here is a bit of a taste of what she told us. >> well, my husband and i are two of the 47 million plus that don't have health care. i'm not talking insurance. i want health care. my husband had diabetes and a bout with cancer. what insurance company is going to cover us. if i get sick, i'm going to the emergency room. who is that costing? i
.6%. positive signs suggesting the worst may be behind us, but folks continue to complain the obama administration is making the modification plan, it's not gaining enough traction. the treasury department talked to mortgage firms saying it's time to pick up the pace. here to discuss is john taylor. welcome. good to see you. i want to show you and our viewers some numbers here and it really describes what's going on. you see the pace of foreclosures starts higher and higher and then the pace of loan mod. not keeping track at all of foreclosures. why isn't the plan getting more traction? >> well, for one, you know, it's really dependent upon the services. they voluntarily come in and participate in the program. that's been slow to come under the bush administration and slow to come under this administration. >> why don't they want to help? what's the hold up? >> well, i think for one, i think that a lot of these investors and services are waiting for what you were just talking about, the market to turn around so they don't have to take as big a hit. a lot of them don't have the capac
, just may be behind us. but folks across the country continue to complain that the obama administration's making home affordable loan modification plan is not gaining enough traction. now, the treasury department talked to mortgage firms saying it's time to pick up the pace. here to discuss this is the john taylor, the president and ceo of the national community reinvestment coalition. welcome, john. >> hey, gerri. nice to see you. >> i want to show you and our viewers some numbers here. it really describes what's going on. you see the pace of foreclosures starts higher and higher, and then the pace of loan mods not keeping track at all with foreclosures. what's going on here? why isn't the president's plan getting more traction? >> well, for one, it's really dependent -- it's a voluntary system dependent upon these services who manage these loans, so banks and investors, to voluntarily come in and participate in the program. that's been slow to come. it was slow to come under the bush administration and it's slow to come under this administration. >> why don't they want to -- why don't
for us and most importantly tell us why it matters and what it really means for you. thanks for being here. appreciate it. >> of course, poppy. the big news this week about health care reform was whether or not the public option, which is basically government sponsored health care as an option has to be a part of health care reform. obama proposed it and then there were some questions as to whether or not he was backing away. here's what secretary of health and human services kathleen sebelius had to say. >> here's the bottom line. absolutely nothing is changed. we continue to support the public option. that will help lower costs, give american consumers more choice, and keep private insurers honest. if people have other ideas about how to accomplish these goals we'll look at those too but the public option is a very good way to do this. >> so, poppy, what it sounds like she's saying is we like the public option here in the white house but it's not a deal breaker. >> elizabeth, what exactly is a public option? there is so much debate about what it is and what it isn't. >> right. i thi
the country on what else? the cnn express. joining us now from the missouri state fair. talk about getting the pulse of america, ali, what are you hearing? >> reporter: yeah. this is a fantastic place to do that. we've been driving from atlanta to des moines and we passed through georgia, kentucky, tennessee. illinois, missouri heading into kansas and iowa and we're talking to people usually in places smaller than would normally get media coverage about health care. in the beginning of the week as the debate was really heating up on tv with the town hall meetings we were trying to get a quieter discussion going. there was plenty of disagreement where we went. we ended up in one interesting place in paducah, kentucky, northwestern kentucky just on the illinois border and had a bit of a town hall meeting. one of the women was formerly a congressional candidate. she was a democratic candidate who ran in the last election and lost but had some very, very strong views on health care. here is a bit of a taste of what she told us. >> my husband and i are two of the 47 million plus that don't have
so we got the person who knows the most about it with us today. i want to share some numbers we have, though, and ask you about them. >> sure. >> total number of clunkers out there, some 40 million. even with the $2 billion we'll take out less than a million of these clunkers. is that enough? are we really getting traction against the problems the president says he'd like to fix? >> car for clunkers is a start. it's a program we need right now because of the issues and challenges of the auto industry. we've got to help the auto industry and also help the consumer. you have millions of consumers out there who have these clunkers and it cost them a lot to fill it up with gas at the pump. it costs a lot to go to work and back and forth with this clunker. on average, people who trade in their clunkers are now saving $750 a year in gas with their new car. >> and as that price goes up they'll save even more. >> exactly. at $2.60 a gallon. imagine if it goes back to $4? we are predicting gas will go back to $4 within nine months. >> what? back to four bucks. >> back to four bucks. >> all ri
there fighting for the u.s. automakers. we were fighting for higher efficiency and the u.s. auto makers. in the end, the compromise was 22 mpg. here's the good news. consumers are voting with their wheels for higher efficiency. on average they are trading in cars 60% now higher than the ones they brought in. >> but, jack, if one of the goals is to get americans to buy american cars it's not working. you look at the list of cars in terms of popularity. >> sure. >> they tend to be japanese. >> actually, it is working in several respects. first 45% of the cars being bought are from the detroit big three. second, most of the toyotas and hondas being bought are made in america by u.s. auto workers. in tennessee, alabama, mississippi. >> wheels within wheels. >> yes. >> they are. the companies themselves are obviously not in this country, japanese but -- >> they're making the cars right here. >> what's next? after cash for clunkers do we get a new program to take its place? >> a great question. we just got $2 billion more for the program. so, we have $3 billion. i think we need to get $1 bill
situation or at the hospital and they use an anesthesiologist who is out of network you didn't get to pick that doctor. so you shouldn't have to pay. you send a letter to the insurance company and it is actually one of the ways to get really good results. >> you always say use a letter. that's the best way to make your point, make your case. >> absolutely. >> let's talk a little bit about the kinds of things that state law might require that you be covered for that you may not know about. >> invitro fertilization treatments vary state to state. that's something that who would know that you get that coverage mandated by your state? but there's a great website called family view and you can go there to find out what is covered by your state because of course your insurance company isn't going to advertise the fact that you get that coverage. >> bottom line you may not know what you're covered for. >> that's right. >> it pays to look around and make sure you know everything you're covered for. let's talk about maybe the test i want that i can't get that my insurer doesn't want to pay for. >>
the road using a mifi-- a mobile hotspot that provides up to five shared wi-fi connections. two are downloading the final final revised final presentation. - one just got an email. - woman: what?! hmph. it's being revised again. the copilot is on mapquest. and tom is streaming meeting psych-up music - from meltedmetal.com. - ( heavy metal music playing ) that's happening now with the new mifi from sprint-- z) the mobile hotspot that fits in your pocket. sprint. the now network. deaf, hard-of-hearinĂ·l and people with speech disabilities access www.sprintrelay.com. >>> welcome back to our continuing coverage celebrating the life of senator kennedy, congressman patrick kennedy. >> elected congressman from rhode island who has had his share of problems, the son of senator kennedy and that was joan kennedy his first wife as well. there's john mccain arriving at the basilica. john king is over there. john, you've seen a lot of people walk insofar and there are still more to come. >> a remarkable gathering here, wolf. it was an interesting moment a few moments ago when several cars
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)